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Celery juice benefits – is it really that good for you?

Those of us who drink green juices would agree that they are a necessary evil amidst our ever-growing and increasingly complicated health regimes. Thankfully, these green-hued elixirs are often made more palatable with the welcome addition of berries or an apple thrown in for good measure. And more often than not, I will admit, they are quite tasty.

Imagine then, that you take away the berries, the apple, the coconut water, the almond milk or whatever other additions you’ve included to make this drink remotely enjoyable. Instead, what you’re left with is celery. Just celery. Celery juice.

Not interested? Well, stay with me. Because, according to Instagram, this single ingredient juice is being consumed by thousands of people every day, who are committed to drinking it on an empty stomach each morning. They are preaching it as a magical remedy for an array of ailments including psoriasis and acne to high blood pressure and even mental health concerns. So, as social media would have us believe this humble drink is changing the lives of thousands of people, celebrities and regular Joe Blows alike. Or so it would seem.

according to Instagram, this single ingredient juice is being consumed by thousands of people every day, who are committed to drinking it on an empty stomach each morning. They are preaching it as a magical remedy for an array of ailments including psoriasis and acne to high blood pressure and even mental health concerns

As with any health trend, celery juice had to start somewhere. And if this is a miracle cure-all then Anthony William (better known as the Medical Medium, the ‘originator of the global celery juice movement’) is the Messiah. It should be noted that William doesn’t come with any conventional medical training, however this prophet of good health does come with 4 books under his belt and a regular slot on Gwyneth Paltrow’s website, Goop.

William, and not to mention some fervent celebrity followers such as Debra Messing and Kimmy K, tout celery juice as life-changing, but others (most of whom are from the actual medical profession) have hit back that this is merely a trend at the apex of misleading pseudoscience.

Me? I fall somewhere in between.

I don’t want to liken myself to a cynic or a skeptic, but I believe that a single vegetable should not, and cannot, be a cure-all. I am a believer that a balanced diet rich in colorful fresh produce (celery included), organic lean protein and whole grains (and enjoying the odd indulgence) is the most sustainable approach to our health that we can make. Having said that, as someone who has experienced unfavorable skin conditions and often crippling anxiety, anything that promises to eradicate these complaints will grab my attention.

William claims that on top of skin conditions, drinking celery juice will also result in lowering inflammation, supporting weight loss, healing digestion, reducing bloating, helping prevent UTIs, helping lower cholesterol and protecting liver health. Impressive, no?

William claims that on top of skin conditions, drinking celery juice will also result in lowering inflammation, supporting weight loss, healing digestion, reducing bloating, helping prevent UTIs, helping lower cholesterol and protecting liver health

Of course, dieticians and nutritionists will always agree that packing more vegetables into your daily diet will only do good things for your body. It should be noted though that celery is high in vitamin C and vitamin K, which can sometimes interfere with certain medications. So, as with any major changes to your health regimen, perhaps consult a medical professional before diving head first into a bucket of celery juice.

These practitioners also warn that consuming celery in juice form strips it of its beneficial fiber content, which is necessary for feeding the healthy bacteria in our gut (let’s not forget that gut health is crucial for overall wellbeing as well). As a guide we should be eating around 25-29 grams of fiber each day, yet many of us struggle to hit just 20 grams. These figures alone should be encouragement enough for us to consume MORE fiber rather than reducing it with a liquid diet.

My verdict is that celery (liquid or solid) IS good for you. If you want to munch on celery stalks smothered in nut butter, then, by all means, do so. Or, if you want to guzzle down spicy neon green juice every morning then go ahead if that’s your jam. It won’t do you any harm. Just don’t place this cult drink on a pedestal at the expense of all other healthy options or the advice of your current health practitioner.

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Sophie Flecknoe

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